Feature Comparisons

  1. Laboratory Water Purification System Differences, Types, Uses Comparison

    Laboratory Water Purification System Differences, Types, Uses Comparison

    Water purification systems remove a wide variety of contaminants from feed water (tap water or pre-treated water) to produce pure water ideal for a host of applications within the lab.

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  2. Comparison Guide: Lab Incubators, Orbital, and Refrigerated Shakers

    Laboratory shakers rotate in an orbital, or reciprocating, motion to ensure thorough mixing of liquid samples and reagents.

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  3. PCR Thermal Cyclers - Comparison and Differences

    PCR Thermal Cyclers - Comparison and Differences

    PCR thermal cyclers optimize sample conditions to empower the amplification of target nucleic acid sequences for quantitative and qualitative analysis. Thermal cyclers are designed to perform two types of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods: end-point, or standard PCR, and real-time qPCR.

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  4. Lab Vortexer Guide: Features, Accessories, and Style Comparison

    Lab Vortexer Guide: Features, Accessories, and Style Comparison

    Vortexers, or vortex mixers, gently agitate liquid samples by creating a vortex motion within the sample tube. Vortexers are composed of a drive shaft, oriented vertically, and connected to an electric motor, encased in a plastic or steel housing. The top end of the drive shaft protrudes from the housing and attaches to a micro-tube cup adapter or rack designed to accommodate microplates or multiple test tubes. Simple vortexers turn on automatically when a micro-tube, containing the sample, is pressed into the rubber cup. Advanced vortexers include analog or digital controllers with on/off switches, mixing speed controls, vortex timers, and alarms.

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  5. Laboratory Homogenizer and Sonicator Features, Styles, and Accessories Comparison

    Laboratory Homogenizer and Sonicator Features, Styles, and Accessories Comparison

    Laboratory homogenizers mix, blend or pulverize chemical and biological samples to form a uniform, homogenous suspension for further analysis. More specifically, homogenizers are used to lyse cellular structures, mill environmental samples, emulsify immiscible materials, and disperse chemical compounds by particle size.

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  6. Laboratory Microplate and Microtiter Features and Accessory Comparison

    Microplates, or microtiter plates, are designed to hold microliter aliquots of samples for analytical research and clinical diagnostic testing. 

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  7. Compare Lab Circulator and Chillers Features, Uses, and Configurations

    Compare Lab Circulator and Chillers Features, Uses, and Configurations

    Laboratory circulators and chillers precisely control the temperature of deionized water, bath fluid, or PH-neutral buffer for delivery to integrated or external water baths, analytical instruments, incubators, and wet processing stations.

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  8. Lab Transilluminator Features Comparison

    Lab Transilluminator Features Comparison

    Laboratory transilluminators,or gel light boxes, are used by life science labs to visualize DNA, RNA or protein samples separated throughgel electrophoresis. Lab transilluminators contain an ultraviolet UV) or visible blue or white) light source, glass viewing surface, UV-blocking or amber filter cover.

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  9. Laboratory and Cleanroom Ovens Feature Comparison

    Laboratory and Cleanroom Ovens Feature Comparison

    Laboratory ovens are composed of a heating element connected to a sample storage chamber and regulated by an analog or digital controller. While the internal storage chamber is commonly made from chemical-resistant, 304-grade stainless steel, the oven exterior is regularly made from corrosion-resistant, durable powder-coated steel. 

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  10. Laboratory Refrigerator Comparison Guide for Clinical, Research and Environmental Settings

    Laboratory Refrigerator Comparison Guide for Clinical, Research and Environmental Settings

    Laboratory and medical-grade refrigerators are manufactured in a broad range of sizes, from benchtop models smaller than 6 cubic feet to upright, double-door models larger than 40 cubic feet. Refrigerators smaller than 6 cubic feet are designed to fit on crowded work surfaces or under pharmacy counters to provide point-of-use cold storage for media, reagents, or vaccines.

    High-capacity, upright refrigerators include microprocessor controls to maintain precise, uniform conditions throughout the storage area to prevent sample spoilage due to temperature fluctuations. Double-door and triple-door refrigerators isolate samples from different production batches to prevent cross-contamination and exposure during refrigerator access.

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